Coronavirus latest More than 100,000 cases in Germany

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Germany now has more than 100,000 coronavirus infections, according to Johns Hopkins University’s figures. UK PM Boris Johnson has been hospitalized, 10 days after testing positive for COVID-19. Follow DW for more.

    

– Cases of COVID-19 in Germany have surpassed 100,000, with more than 1,500 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University

– Germany’s Robert Koch Institute reports a lower figure of just over 95,300

– Johnson’s office says the PM was hospitalized for “tests” on the advice of his doctor

– Japan’s prime minister is reportedly set to declare a state of emergency

– US President Donald Trump says US virus death toll will reach ”a horrific point”

Updates in Universal Coordinated Time (UTC/GMT) 

07:11 Bundesliga leaders Bayern Munich have resumed team practices at their training ground, the club announced on their website.
The FC Bayern Munich first team will return to training at Säbener Straße in small groups from Monday, April 6,” the club said.

“This will be done in coordination with government policy and the relevant authorities.”

The Bundesliga, which last held a match on March 11, has suspended its season until at least April 30.

The Deutsche Fussball Liga (DFL), the company that presides over Germany’s top two divisions, recommended that training not resume until April 5. However, several German teams are still having their players train individually in their homes.

07:19 Two demonstrations in the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia against the transport of nuclear materials have received official permission to go ahead despite coronavirus restrictions, according to several German media outlets.

However, the vigils in the cities of Münster and Gronau were permitted to take place only under the condition that the 15 participants at each event wear protective masks and stay 1.5 meters (5 feet) from each other, organizers said.

The demonstrators want to protest against a planned transport of uranium hexafluoride, used in the process of uranium enrichment, from the Gronau enrichment plant to the Russian nuclear facility in Novouralsk.

Watch this video to find out more about Germany’s struggle to find a solution for the storage of nuclear waste:

The search for nuclear waste storage solutions

06:46 British Prime Minister Boris Johnson spent the night in hospital with acute coronavirus symptoms and will have further tests today, UK Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick told the BBC.

Jenrick added that Johnson continues to lead the government despite his condition.

“He’s been working extremely hard, leading the government and being constantly updated, that’s going to continue,” Jenrick said. “Obviously, today, he’s in hospital having the test, but he’ll continue to be kept informed as to what’s happening and to be in charge of the government.”

06:39 Japan is considering calling a six-month period for an impending state of emergency declaration in response to the coronavirus pandemic, according to broadcaster TBS.

The move would cover Tokyo and three neighboring prefectures, as well as Osaka, TBS said. These prefectures would decide the length of time for their individual measures within the six-month period.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe could declare a state of emergency as soon as Tuesday, according to Japanese media. The Yomiuri Shinbun newspaper said Abe would likely announce his plan for the emergency later Monday.

06:30 Taiwan has urged people who visited tourist spots during the popular Tomb Sweeping Festival last week to do adopt disease control measures to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

Taiwan’s Central Epidemic Command Center asked peopleto minimize time spent outside, wear a face mask in public and check their body temperature twice daily for 14 days.

Despite being advised to practice social distancing, millions of people traveled around Taiwan during the four-day festival, which ended on Sunday.

06:01 A 4-year-old Malayan tiger at the Bronx Zoo in New York City has become the first tiger in the world to contract the new coronavirus. The tiger began showing respiratory symptoms on March 27. An asymptomatic employee of the zoo is believed to have infected it.

Six other cats have also fallen ill, but they have not tested positive for COVID-19. The zoo has been closed to the public since March 16.

The zoo said there is no evidence that animals play a role in the transmission of COVID-19 to people other than the initial event in the Wuhan market, and no evidence that any person has been infected with COVID-19 in the US by animals, including by pet dogs or cats.”

Other animal coronavirus cases have been documented around the world. A pet cat in Belgium tested positive for the disease, as has two dogs in Hong Kong. No animal deaths from the virus have been reported.

Tiger Nadia (Reuters/WCS)Malayan tiger Nadia has tested positive for coronavirus

05:36 Germany’s government has allowed breweries to defer the annual beer tax, giving them greater financial flexibility during the coronavirus crisis.

Breweries can submit applications to defer the tax to main customs offices until December 31, 2020, Germany’s Finance Ministry told the German DPA news agency.

A standard crate with 20 half-liter beer bottles is charged €0.94 ($1.02) in beer tax in Germany, according to trade publication Lebensmittel Zeitung. The tax is paid to federal states.

Beer tax payments from 2019 are expected to amount to €650 million, according to Finance Ministry figures.

04:38 Germany’s confirmed coronavirus infections rose by 3,677 in the past 24 hours, according to data from the Robert Koch Institute for infectious diseases (RKI).

The figure was lower than the 5,936 new infections reported on Sunday and represents a fourth straight drop in the daily rate of new cases.

The new infections put Germany’s total at 95,391 according to RKI data, though Johns Hopkins University has reported a slightly higher figure of 100,123.

03:45 Here is the latest from across the Americas

Ecuador President Lenin Moreno warned that the death toll from the coronavirus pandemic was likely higher than current figures show. Authorities are collecting more than 100 bodies a day and storing them in giant refrigerated containers, with morgues and hospitals at capacity.

Ecuador has one of the highest COVID-19 tallies in Latin America. “This pandemic is overcoming the capacity of our hospital services,” Guayaquil’s Teodoro Maldonado Carbo hospital said in a statement on Friday.

Moreno said his government expected the total number of fatalities in Guayaquil’s surrounding province to reach up to 3,500, adding that a “special camp” was being built to bury the dead.

Authorities have promised to activate a new digital system to allow families to find out where their deceased relatives were buried.

Latest figures: 3,646 infected, 180 deaths, 100 recovered

Mexico President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador unveiled a plan to help the poor and create jobs, as the coronavirus pandemic takes a toll on the economy. Lopez Obrador has promised to create 2 million new jobs in the next nine months and boost small business and housing loans.

But he also vowed to increase public sector austerity to avoid debt.

 

“This crisis is temporary, transitory,” Lopez Obrador said in a televised speech. “Normality will return soon. We will defeat the coronavirus, we will reactivate the economy.”

Latest figures: 1,890 infected, 79 deaths, 633 recovered

Haiti reported its first death linked to COVID-19, the Health Ministry said. Experts have warned that a spread of COVID-19 in the impoverished country could be devastating, given Haiti’s widespread malnutrition and overburdened healthcare system

Most homes do not have proper sanitation, lacking piped water and relying instead on communal taps, water trucks or often contaminated springs.

Latest figures: 21 infected, 1 deaths, 1 recovered

Central Chile has grown vulnerable to the coronavirus pandemic, gripped by a drought that has left river flows historically low and reservoirs running dry.

Greenpeace-Chile has called on the government of President Sebastian Pinera to “guarantee that there are no second-class citizens without the basics to protect themselves from COVID-19.”

“Having soap is useless if there’s not enough water to wash with it,” said Matias Asun, the director of Greenpeace-Chile.

Rodrigo Mundaca, spokesman for the Movement for the Defense of Water, the Earth and the Protection of the Environment, told AFP that there were currently “400,000 families, nearly 1.5 million people approximately,” facing water insecurity.

Latest figures: 4,471 infected, 24 deaths, 618 recovered

The number of people killed by COVID-19 in Canada jumped by just over 20% to 258 in a day, officials said. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said officials would tap army reservists to offer them full-time jobs for the coming months.

“Bolstering the military’s ranks will help offset some of the economic consequences of COVID-19 and ensure our communities are well supported,” Trudeau told a daily briefing.

The prime minister had already announced on Friday that members of the Canadian Rangers, reservists based in remote regions, would be deployed to northern Quebec to help provide healthcare to the isolated indigenous population.

Nearly half Canada’s coronavirus cases are in the province of Quebec, whose premier, Francois Legault, said he was extending a shutdown of non-essential businesses for another three weeks to May 4.

Latest figures: 15,871 infected, 281 deaths, 3,054 recovered

Despite sparking outrage over his response to the coronavirus epidemic, most people in Brazildo not think President Jair Bolsonaro should resign, a poll by newspaper Folha de S.Paulo revealed.

Some 59% opposed Bolsonaro’s resignation, while 37% approved.

The Brazilian president has downplayed COVID-19 as a “little flu” and clashed with governors, as well as his own health minister, over social distancing measures, which he sees as economically disastrous.

Bolsonaro called for a national day of fasting and prayer on Palm Sunday to “free Brazil from this evil” epidemic.

Latest figures: 11,281 infected, 487 deaths, 127 recovered

The government of Guatemala has asked the US to limit its deportations of migrants to the Central American country to 25 people per plane, Health Minister Hugo Monroy said.

“We are requesting that … to safeguard the health of the country,” Monroy told a news conference.

The request comes after two deported migrants, who had arrived asymptomatic, tested positive for the virus and were hospitalized.

Latest figures: 70 infected, 3 deaths, 15 recovered

03:23 United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres is urging governments across the world to look at prevention of violence against women in their response to the coronavirus pandemic, warning of a “horrifying global surge” in domestic violence.

“We know lockdowns and quarantines are essential to suppressing COVID-19. But they can trap women with abusive partners,” Guterres said in a video message. “Over the past weeks as economic and social pressures and fear have grown, we have seen a horrifying global surge in domestic violence.”

Guterres urged governments to ensure that prosecution of abusers continues during the pandemic. He also discussed the possibility of setting up warning systems in pharmacies and grocery stores and listing shelters under essential services.

Several nations including Germany have highlighted that the lockdowns and social restrictions imposed to tackle the spread of COVID-19 could lead to a rise in cases of domestic violence.

Germany’s poor hit hard by coronavirus lockdown

02:18 South Korea reported less than 50 new cases of COVID-19 for the first time since infections peaked on February 29.

The Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) said there were 47 new cases of coronavirus in the country, with the total number of cases reaching 10,284.

Deaths in South Korea rose by three, taking the total number to 186.

01:33 Prime Minister Shinzo Abe plans to declare a state of emergency in Japan, news agency Kyodo reported, citing a government official. The move is said to be in response to the rising numbers of coronavirus infections in the country.

Just this weekend, 143 new cases were recorded. Japan has a total of 3,654 COVID-19 infections, 1,000 of which are in Tokyo. Eighty-five people have died from the virus.

The emergency declaration will enable authorities to close schools and issue stay-at-home orders, particularly in major cities such as Tokyo and Osaka.

Though Japan has not been acutely affected by the epidemic, experts worry that a sudden surge in cases could strain the medical system, in a country with a large elderly population.

01:11 The total number of coronavirus cases in mainland China has risen by 39 to 81,708 as of Sunday. All except one were imported cases.

A total of 3,331 deaths have been reported in the country since the start of the outbreak, with one new death on Sunday in Hubei province, where the COVID-19 pandemic began. No new cases of infection were reported in Hubei, however.

Seventy-eight new asymptomatic cases were also reported by the National Health Commission.

Wuhan slowly moves on from corona crisis

 

00:00 President Donald Trump said he was hopeful that the US could be seeing a ”leveling off” of the coronavirus crisis in some of the country’s hot spots for the viral outbreak.

“We see light at the end of the tunnel. Things are happening,” the president said during his daily White House briefing on the subject. But he warned that still, the US would reach ”a horrific point” in terms of deaths.

Trump added that some 1.67 million Americans had been tested so far and he again pushed the notion that hydroxychloroquine would be effective against the virus.

Despite the fact that no conclusive evidence exists to support the claim, Trump said that there were ”some very strong signs” that the drug helped and announced that the government had purchased ”a tremendous amount” of it.

Coronavirus infections in the US spiraling

Catch up on yesterday’s coronavirus news: UK PM Boris Johnson hospitalized with COVID-19 symptoms

In reporting on the coronavirus pandemic, unless otherwise specified, DW uses figures provided by the Johns Hopkins University (JHU) Coronavirus Resource Center in the United States. JHU updates figures in real time, collating data from world health organizations, state and national governments and other public official sources, all of whom have their own systems for compiling information.

Germany’s national statistics are compiled by its public health agency, the Robert Koch Institute (RKI). These figures depend on data transmission from state and local levels and are updated around once a day, which can lead to deviation from JHU.

source” dw.com

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